Science

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 2017-09-21 20:45 

NPR

[ Science ]

How Prepared Is The U.S. For Earthquakes?... +

Mexico has had an earthquake early-warning system for decades, and other countries that get earthquakes Japan, Taiwan have them, too. The U.S. does not. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks to seismologist Dr. Lucy Jones, who spent years working with the U.S. Geol...

 2017-09-21 20:45 

Scientific American

If At First You Don't Succeed, Show Your Baby Again... +

Infants who saw a researcher keep at a difficult task tried harder themselves ...

 2017-09-21 20:13 

ScienceDaily.com

Preterm children have more medical sleep problems but fall asleep more independently... +

A new study suggests that while healthy preterm children have more medical sleep problems than full-term children, they are more likely to fall asleep independently....

 2017-09-21 20:12 

ScienceDaily.com

New technique accurately digitizes transparent objects... +

A new imaging technique makes it possible to precisely digitize clear objects and their surroundings, an achievement that has eluded current state-of-the-art 3-D rendering methods....

 2017-09-21 20:12 

ScienceDaily.com

Strong alcohol policies help reduce alcohol-involved homicides... +

Stronger alcohol policies, including taxes and sales restrictions, have been shown to reduce the likelihood of alcohol involvement among homicide victims, according to a new study....

 2017-09-21 20:12 

ScienceDaily.com

Babies can learn that hard work pays off... +

A new study reveals babies as young as 15 months can learn the value of hard work. Researchers found babies who watched an adult struggle to reach two different goals before succeeding tried harder at their own difficult task than babies who saw an adult ...

 2017-09-21 20:12 

ScienceDaily.com

Ozark grasslands experience major increase in trees and shrubs... +

Woody vegetation, such as trees and shrubs, has increased dramatically in Ozark grasslands over the past 75 years, according to a study. If these ecosystems continue to favor woody vegetation, will it be possible to maintain open grasslands for the forese...

 2017-09-21 20:12 

ScienceDaily.com

'Labyrinth' chip could help monitor aggressive cancer stem cells... +

Inspired by the Labyrinth of Greek mythology, a new chip etched with fluid channels sends blood samples through a hydrodynamic maze to separate out rare circulating cancer cells into a relatively clean stream for analysis. It is already in use in a breast...

 2017-09-21 20:12 

ScienceDaily.com

New hope for people with fibromyalgia... +

A novel psychological therapy that encourages addressing emotional experiences related to trauma, conflict and relationship problems has been found helpful for people with the chronic pain condition fibromyalgia....

 2017-09-21 20:12 

ScienceDaily.com

Unique gene therapy prevents, reverses multiple sclerosis in animal model... +

Multiple sclerosis can be inhibited or reversed using a novel gene therapy technique that stops the disease's immune response in mouse models, researchers have found....

 2017-09-21 20:12 

ScienceDaily.com

Into more thin air: Exploring the adaptation extremes of human high altitude sickness and fitness... +

Many research groups have explored human adaptation to high altitude living among three major far-flung global populations: Tibetans, Ethiopians and Peruvians. But few have simultaneously explored the other extreme---maladaptation----in the form of chroni...

 2017-09-21 20:11 

Nature

Golden Germany... +

Government's push for excellence is creating a golden age of opportunity for scientists flocking to the country....

 2017-09-21 20:11 

Nature

High-energy cosmic rays come from outside our Galaxy... +

Giant observatory announces long-awaited result....

 2017-09-21 20:11 

Nature

Fiction: The science in Sherlock Holmes... +

Maria Konnikova detects the fictional sleuth's inner researcher, 130 years on from his 'birth'....

 2017-09-21 20:11 

Nature

Engineering: Reclusive genius who connected the world... +

W. Bernard Carlson relishes a biography of a self-taught engineer who revolutionized telecommunications....

 2017-09-21 20:11 

Nature

Relativity: Final ascent of physics... +

Robert P. Crease applauds the third volume of a thrilling guide to a special pursuit....

 2017-09-21 20:11 

Nature

Outside the lab: Side jobs for scientists... +

Paid work beyond the bench can offer a welcome source of income to cash-strapped junior researchers and provide opportunities for career development....

 2017-09-21 20:10 

Nature

Historical data: Hidden in the past... +

Old photos, logbooks and papers are a gold mine for fields such as ecology and climatology....

 2017-09-21 20:10 

Nature

Maryam Mirzakhani 1977 2017... +

Pioneering mathematician and winner of the Fields Medal....

 2017-09-21 19:52 

Sky & Telescope

Puffed-Up Hot Jupiter Is Surprisingly Dark... +

Researchers have found that a football-shaped, ultra-hot gas giant thats being devoured by its host star is also one of the least reflective exoplanets ever found. The post Puffed-Up Hot Jupiter Is Surprisingly Dark appeared first on Sky & Telescope....

 2017-09-21 19:44 

TreeHugger

This homegrown project brings new meaning to the term magic mushrooms... +

Ecovative, a leader in the budding mycelium materials field, is offering a DIY kit that "grows" a lampshade....

 2017-09-21 19:43 

The Conversation AU

Lost in space: Australia dwindled from space leader to also-ran in 50 years... +

Australia worked closely with the UK, Europe and USA in developing space capability in the 1950s and 1960s. from www.shutterstock.com The eyes of the worlds space expertise will be on Australia this month, as Adelaide hosts the worlds largest space confer...

 2017-09-21 19:43 

The Conversation AU

The origin of extreme cosmic ray particles revealed: they come from distant galaxies... +

Detecting cosmic ray particles: a water-Cherenkov detector seen against the night sky at the Pierre Auger Observatory in western Argentina. Steven Saffi, University of Adelaide, Author providedThe existence of high-energy cosmic ray particles bombarding E...

 2017-09-21 19:39 

livemint

Irrational use of third generation advanced antibiotics must be discouraged: study... +

A study shows that three in every five, or about 62%, children hospitalized in India are on at least one third-generation advanced antibiotic...

 2017-09-21 19:35 

Phys.org

Neanderthal boy's skull grew like a human child's: study... +

The first analysis of a Neanderthal boy's skull uncovered in Spain suggests that he grew much like a modern boy would, in another sign that our extinct ancestors were similar to us, researchers said Thursday....

 2017-09-21 19:34 

Seeker

A flatworm wriggling in and out of a teen's eyeball in Mexico caused serious damage to his vision, according to the New England Journal of Medicine.... +

Credit: The New England Journal of Medicine 2017When doctors in Mexico peered into a 17-year-old boy's eye, they got a squirming surprise: a flatworm wriggling in and out of the teen's eyeball. The teen, who lives in a rural village, had gone to the ...

 2017-09-21 19:31 

Seeker

Neanderthals were brainer than modern humans, and new research helps to explain how these early hominids evolved so much brain power.... +

Credit: Andrs Diaz-CSIC CommunicationEl Sidrn Cave in northwestern Spain preserved the remains of at least 12 Neanderthals for about 49,000 years until their discovery in 2010. Genetic evidence suggests the group 3 adult males, 3 adult females, 3 ado...

 2017-09-21 19:13 

National Geographic

Medieval Porpoise Burial Puzzles Scientists... +

Video shows the "unparalleled4; find among the ruins of a monastic retreat....

 2017-09-21 19:12 

ScienceNews.org

Plate tectonics started at least 3.5 billion years ago ... +

Analyses of titanium in rock suggest plate tectonics began 500 million years earlier than thought....

 2017-09-21 19:11 

Phys.org

New technique accurately digitizes transparent objects... +

A new imaging technique makes it possible to precisely digitize clear objects and their surroundings, an achievement that has eluded current state-of-the-art 3D rendering methods. The ability to create detailed, 3D digital versions of real-world objects a...

 2017-09-21 19:06 

TreeHugger

13 storey tower built of sustainably harvested Brazilian wood... +

Brazil is often in Treehugger because of illegal logging and deforestation. Not this time....

 2017-09-21 19:03 

Seeker

Astronomers have identified a weird pair of orbiting asteroids, called 288P, as the first known binary asteroid also classified as a comet.... +

Credit: ESA/Hubble, L. Calada.Astronomers recently spotted two space rocks behaving strangely. As the asteroids orbited each other, both of them appeared to be shedding material just like a comet does observations revealed a coma around the objects a...

 2017-09-21 19:00 

TreeHugger

Photo: Bitty burrowing owl peeks out from below... +

Our photo of the day features one of the smallest of North American owls....

 2017-09-21 19:00 

New Scientist

Far-off galaxies are firing rare high-energy cosmic rays at us... +

The highest energy particles in the universe hit Earth very rarely, so it took 10 years of data to pinpoint their origin. Theyre coming from galaxies far, far away...

 2017-09-21 19:00 

New Scientist

There is no way to spot big earthquakes ahead of time... +

Large earthquakes look just like small ones when they start out, so early warning systems have no clues to help figure out if a quake is going to be huge...

 2017-09-21 19:00 

Scientific American

U.S. Safety Board Says Train-Crash Engineers Had Undiagnosed Sleep Disorders... +

The drivers had no memory of the NYC-area incidents ...

 2017-09-21 18:30 

Scientific American

Why the Mexico City Earthquake Shook Up Disaster Predictions... +

Tuesday’s deadly quake did not come from the place many geologists thought would unleash the next “big one” ...

 2017-09-21 18:30 

Scientific American

Why the Mexico City Earthquake Shook Up Disaster Predictions... +

Tuesday’s deadly quake did not come from the place many geologists thought would unleash the next “big one” ...

 2017-09-21 18:14 

TreeHugger

It's a rule of the road: When it is easy to drive, people drive.... +

But when it is slow and inconvenient to drive, even cranky right wing columnists turn to bikes...

 2017-09-21 18:13 

ScienceDaily.com

Dancing electrons lose the race... +

Ultrashort pulses of light were employed by physicists to start a race between electrons emitted from different initial states in a solid material. Timing this race revealed an unexpected result: the fastest electrons arrived in last place....

 2017-09-21 18:13 

ScienceDaily.com

Synthetic molecule 'kicks and kills' some persistent HIV in mice... +

Scientists have designed a synthetic molecule that can reactivate dormant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in mice and lead to the death of some of the infected cells, according to a new study....

 2017-09-21 18:13 

ScienceDaily.com

Japanese encephalitis vaccine cuts disease rate in Nepal... +

From 2006 through 2011, Nepal conducted a mass immunization campaign against Japanese encephalitis -- a mosquito-borne viral disease. Now, investigators have reported that the vaccination effort prevented thousands of cases of Japanese encephalitis (JE) a...

 2017-09-21 18:13 

ScienceDaily.com

Your neurons register familiar faces, whether you notice them or not... +

When people see an image of a person they recognize particular cells light up in the brain. Now, researchers have found that those cells light up even when a person sees a familiar face or object but fails to notice it. The only difference is that the neu...

 2017-09-21 18:13 

ScienceDaily.com

Ancient DNA data fills in thousands of years of human prehistory in Africa... +

By sequencing the ancient genomes of 15 individuals from different parts of Africa, researchers reporting in the journal Cell on Sept. 21 have reconstructed the prehistory of humans on the continent, going back thousands of years. The findings shed light ...

 2017-09-21 18:13 

ScienceDaily.com

A rapid alternative to standard safety tests for lentiviral vectors... +

A new, publicly available test to assess the safety of cell therapy products altered by lentivirus generates results within a few hours, potentially hastening the pace at which viral immunotherapies move into clinical trial. Current assays required by the...

 2017-09-21 18:13 

ScienceDaily.com

Scientists sequence asexual tiny worm whose lineage stretches back 18 million years... +

A team of scientists has sequenced, for the first time, a tiny worm that belongs to a group of exclusively asexual species that originated approximately 18 million years ago -- making it one of the oldest living lineages of asexual animals known....

 2017-09-21 18:13 

ScienceDaily.com

Green algae could hold clues for engineering faster-growing crops... +

Two new studies provide a detailed look at an essential part of algae's growth machinery, with the eventual goal of applying this knowledge to improving the growth of crops....

 2017-09-21 18:12 

ScienceDaily.com

Detecting cosmic rays from a galaxy far, far away... +

Where do cosmic rays come from? Solving a 50-year-old mystery, a collaboration of researchers has discovered it's much farther than the Milky Way....

 2017-09-21 18:12 

ScienceDaily.com

Jellyfish, with no brains, still seem to sleep... +

The discovery that primitive jellyfish sleep suggests that sleep is an ancient, evolutionarily conserved behavior....

 2017-09-21 18:12 

ScienceDaily.com

Why poison frogs don't poison themselves... +

Poison frogs harbor some of the most potent neurotoxins we know, yet scientists have long wondered -- how do these frogs keep from poisoning themselves? Scientists are now a step closer to resolving that head-scratcher. And the answer has potential conseq...

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